Articles tagged with: architecture

4 things you need to do in your next software selection project & 4 things you need to stop doing

on Saturday, 07 September 2013. Posted in Blog, Enterprise Architecture

4 things you need to do in your next software selection project & 4 things you need to stop doing

 

 

                                                         Software selection is a tricky and strategic process for any corporation. Here are 4 tips, on how to tackle a system selection process:  

1- The system selection process should follow a fact based approach. Gather Application or functional requirements via interviews and workshops from various groups like Operations, Finance, Marketing, and IT. These requirements should provide the basis for the selection. 

2- Employees in various functional areas, including Business Verticals, CRM, BI,ERP or any other type of system of engagement should participate to determine which value add features should be included in the selection criteria process. Through primary and secondary research (e.g. analyst reviews, vendor calls, subject matter expert reviews, independent consultants, vendor websites, etc.), select three to four vendors to issue the selection and invite them to demonstrate their offering.

3- Have a consistent approach for vendor selection analysis, a scoring schedule with weightings should be developed and validated internally. Further, scoring criteria should be established to evaluate the vendor’s software response.

4- Based on the scoring results and qualitative assessment of the vendors’ response and product demonstrations, short list two vendors and perform a total cost of ownership and a internal high level implementation plan. An important rule never select a software that has no product roadmap.

 

Below are some of the most common slipups, If you see your organization doing any of the following, take action quickly!

1- Not knowing up front the full Total Cost of Ownership . A previous client called me last week and was shocked to learn that their perfect $80K open source solution would cost $700K to make useful in their environment and another $250K annually to support. Make sure you perform a TCO.

2- Believing that newer technology will fix business problems is a trap that organizations repeatedly fall into

3- A software selection process that assumes the consent of other stakeholders without their involvement can easily get derailed. I know of several projects that experienced considerable delays after purchase or the software was put on the shelf do to internal reasons.

4- One that is often forgotten, not paying particular attention to integration points, the software selected must fit within your company’s spiderweb architecture.

Feel free to share any useful tips you've experienced.

 

Business architecture always adapt to your audience - 4 tips

on Thursday, 22 August 2013. Posted in Business Analysis, Solution & Business Architecture, Blog

Business architecture always adapt to your audience - 4 tips

 

Always make a point to understand your audience, audience analysis involves identifying the audience and adapting a speech to their interests, level of understanding, attitudes, and beliefs. Taking an audience-centered approach is important because your material effectiveness will be improved if the deliverable is created and delivered in an appropriate manner.

I have seen many times technical people speaking to the business and not talking at the right level and emphasizing technical information like security, protocols and interfaces. An example application A will push the actuals to application B (good) instead of saying Application A attributes are connecting to table AR_Actuals and the trigger releases the information into Application B table GL_Open_balances. 

Depending on your audience adapt your architecture diagrams accordingly.

In my view, here is a sample architecture of a business architecture diagram that will connect with business savvy people to initiate architecture discussions. here are my tips:

  1. A Business Architecture must be process centric
  2. Be able to apply enterprise-wide architecture and process-level models and techniques that are aligned to your roadmap
  3. Develop a measurable architecture for planning, budgeting, organization design, compliance, human change management, and the introduction of breakthrough technologies
  4. Be able to use an architecture model to accelerate capability change projects and model development

 architecture

 Do you have any favorite tips or would like to share your experience on this topic?

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)

on Tuesday, 01 January 2013. Posted in Solution & Business Architecture, Blog

SOA will dramatically change our working environments. Oracle SOA suite is the beginning of standards-based applications that are secured, managed and governed , and are spawned

by changes like Mergers & Acquisitions, regulatory compliance, and increased competition.  

With this in mind, we introduce the concept of a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA).

 

What is SOA it is a design blueprint for applications within an enterprise.
 

 

Corporations will adopt SOA, to increase their business agility, for faster response changes, increased technology asset reuse, reduced integration expenses, reduced business risk & exposure

The ability of SOA to change, evolve, and manage business processes throughout an

enterprise is changing the way IT works. SOA is enabling IT to operate as a

business unit. Alignment and accounting for IT investments is now based on business

strategies and transactions. SOA in an enterprise will identify and highlight

business dependencies and encourages cooperation and communication between

business units and IT.

 

SOA uses Services. Corporate applications evolve into organized collections of what are

referred to as “business services”. Looking at these applications from a service

orientation perspective closely maps to business initiatives and processes. So a

service can be payroll, or extending credit, or adding a new customer—it’s no longer

only a technical transactional process.


A well architected SOA provides top to bottom management visibilityof existing web services, so one doesn’t go on a “scavenger hunt” for any given

application. A SOA provides for a more rapid method of distributing applications and

increased agility. By leveraging, and the reuse of existing enterprise software,

infrastructure, and networking/bandwidth, the costs of custom integration and

interoperability are lowered. Manual tasks are reduced or eliminated. Compliance

within an organization’s industry is accomplished by exposing business

processes and reducing risks. For even greater cost savings, these

business services are reusable for many different applications both within and outside

of the enterprise without costly changes.

Most corporations have started to plan and implement a SOA adoption.

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