5 Tips to engage more efficient meetings

on Tuesday, 21 January 2014. Posted in Blog

5 Tips to engage more efficient meetings

 

 

 

Most of us believe we are very efficient in our meetings, the main issue meetings are not effective we waste valuable time figuring out what we are trying to accomplish in them.

Here some data, in an informal poll conducted by Forbes several years ago, they asked 1000 professionals how they would rate their overall experiences as meeting attendees throughout their careers. Here’s how they responded:

79% rated meetings as “run terribly”

14% rated meetings as “run fairly well”

7% rated meetings as “run extremely well”

Some more statistics:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sebastianbailey/2013/08/08/just-say-no-how-your-meeting-habit-is-harming-you/

http://business.salary.com/why%2Dhow%2Dyour%2Demployees%2Dare%2Dwasting%2Dtime%2Dat%2Dwork/slide/9/

Don’t fall into the bad statistic categories! Here are some tips that I try to follow:

1) A change of scenery and a bit of fun does wonders for getting people thinking differently and loosening up! (Coffee, power walk meeting, restaurant meeting instead of a conference room meeting with PowerPoint)

2) The meeting notes need to be laser focused in answering 3 questions

What do we see as the next steps?

Who should take responsibility for them?

And what should the timeframe be?

Record the answers and send out an email so that everyone is on the same page. This helps with accountability also no one can say they're not sure what really happened.

3) Don't skip writing minutes just because everyone attended the meeting and knows what happened. Meeting notes serve as a record of the meeting long after people forget what happened.

4) Ban the words "cant" "unable" "not possible" from the room and establish a clear donation to local charity by anyone that utters those words

4) Always provide an escape valve, some meetings tend to be intense, following a meeting, it is vital that your team know that your door is always open if they are struggling with the outcome

5) Do use positive language. Rather than describing the discussion as heated or angry, use passionate, lively, or energetic--all of which are just as true as the negative words. 

Wish everyone a 2014 filled with productive meetings captured efficiently in crisp, clear meeting notes!Never forget Ideas are cheap;come with solutions in your meetings

Like usual share your thoughts and advice on the topic.

 

Comments (5)

  • Lisa Broward

    Lisa Broward

    21 January 2014 at 20:53 |
    I would add it should become a crime for meetings to last longer than an hour.
  • Mike Hernandez

    Mike Hernandez

    21 January 2014 at 21:27 |
    Good points, I would add give your employees time to prepare for the meeting. Schedule it a few days in advance and let them know what the meeting is going to be about.
  • Mark O'Dwyer

    Mark O'Dwyer

    21 January 2014 at 21:52 |
    My pov everyone needs to talk. If all participants talk, people will be more engaged and most of the people will pay better attention also not more than 10 people in the meeting.
  • Sam Malik

    Sam Malik

    22 January 2014 at 06:18 |
    My biggest pet peeve about meetings is the notion of being punctual. If you’re the chair, try to end the meeting on time. Attendees have other commitments, and keeping them late is unfair to them and to the others with whom they have commitments.
  • Ron Mcmanis

    Ron Mcmanis

    22 January 2014 at 20:22 |
    Good summary, in my view, meetings are necessary but don't need to be a waste of valuable time. In my experience, people hate meetings because they are not productive and are not fun. If you simply make sure that every discussion in a meeting leads to a stated and agreed upon outcome and then make the process of getting there more enjoyable for the participants, I think you would see a greater investment in the meeting by all involved.

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